A Garden Full of Thoughts♥

Name: Meli
Age: currently 23
I would like to think that I'm a Grammar Nazi, but even I have issues with grammar (and punctuation - I'm a bit obsessive with my commas). I'm a young graphic designer, web designer, and varied artist, and this is a place where my mind is free to flounder from the harbor. :)
~Disclaimer~
This is a multifandom blog.

Ask me anything :)   |   Got something to share? Please submit :D   |   What I Post/Reblog   |   14 Rules for Being You  


windblownpages:

I’m a librocubicularist; I read in bed. 

(Source: windblownpages.wordpress.com, via superbooked)

— 26 minutes ago with 1185 notes
victoriousvocabulary:

BIBLIOMANCY
[noun]
divination by means of a book, especially one considered to have sacred or magical text. Typically the method is to open a book at a random page to some verse or passage, which is then interpreted.
[Vladimir Kush]

victoriousvocabulary:

BIBLIOMANCY

[noun]

divination by means of a book, especially one considered to have sacred or magical text. Typically the method is to open a book at a random page to some verse or passage, which is then interpreted.

[Vladimir Kush]

— 29 minutes ago with 320 notes
#so it is a word... wow  #divination 

medievalpoc:

no1iknow:

medievalpoc:

Tomb Effigy of Jean d’Alluye, mid–13th century
French; Made in Loire Valley
Limestone; 83 1/2 x 34 1/4 in. (212.1 x 87 cm)
The Cloisters Collection, 1925 (25.120.201)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Photo credits:

1. Tomb Effigy of Jean d’Alluye (photograph by palindrome6996/Flickr user)

2. A closer look at the sword (photograph by Allison Meier of atlasobscura.com)

3.  (photograph by Qabluna/Flickr user)

Alec submitted to medievalpoc:

Saw this in person a while back and though it was pretty interesting that this person / his family thought the sword was important enough to put on his tomb effigy.

It also is pretty clear evidence for contact, at least indirectly (not that that’s in question) between China and France.

You can read an article about this sword here.

OK, I’ve read the article, and it doesn’t make sense, given what the pictures show. Why is a French knight’s sword with a trefoil/fluer-de-lys pommel and an atypical but unremarkable crosspiece presented as Chinese? The article says something about the blade, but that isn’t even “visible”, the blade is hidden in the scabbard, which appears to have been carved to show it holding a standard straight medieval blade.

I’m confused. It would be a neat find, but…

"Being presented as Chinese”? Interesting choice of phrasing there…

Maybe you should ask the Curator Emeritus of Arms and Armor at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, whose article is cited in THAT article:

image

and quoted:

Whether it was traded peacefully along the ancient Silk Road, or was carried by a raider on the conquering horses of the Mongols, whether Jean d’Alluye acquired it as an exotic collector’s item in the bazaar of some Levantine port, or took it as booty on a Syrian battlefield, we will never know.

I mean, yeah, question what you read but also check the sources if you have questions. This isn’t smoke and mirrors, it’s research.

— 31 minutes ago with 235 notes
#I loved loved loved that you tagged this under bibliomancy  #like why isn't it a word?  #bibliomancy 
aplaceforart:

by Matthew Taylor Wilson / more art here

aplaceforart:

by Matthew Taylor Wilson / more art here

— 34 minutes ago with 479 notes
aplaceforart:

DO WHAT YOU CAN… by Matthew Taylor Wilson / more art here

aplaceforart:

DO WHAT YOU CAN… by Matthew Taylor Wilson / more art here

— 34 minutes ago with 1219 notes